CareerHMO http://careerhmo.com Career Coaching for Job Search Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:51:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 The #1 Secret to Building an Effective Network by Coach Bud Bilanich http://careerhmo.com/the-1-secret-to-building-an-effective-network-by-coach-bud-bilanich/ http://careerhmo.com/the-1-secret-to-building-an-effective-network-by-coach-bud-bilanich/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 15:51:36 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2154 networking

There’s an old saying, “Your network is your net worth.” It means that the bigger and stronger your network, the more successful you are likely to be. There’s a lot of stuff out there on how to build a network – in person or on LinkedIn. In this post I want to concentrate on something that a lot of networking advice misses – how your behavior can help you build and maintain a strong network that will be there for you when you need it.
One of the most requested of my talks as called, “How to Build Unshakeable Self Confidence.” I deliver this talk five or six times a year to different groups.

One of the keys to self confidence that I discuss in the talk is the importance of surrounding yourself with positive people. I make the point that the best way to surround yourself with positive people is to be a positive, helpful person yourself.

This point was really driven home to me by some recent events in my personal life. Cathy, my wife, has been having some rather serious health issues lately. This has led to some stress for me. I’m trying to take care of her and meet my commitments to my consulting and coaching clients, my CareerHMO colleagues and my students.

I was falling behind a little on all of these fronts. When I told my clients, colleagues and students about my personal problems, I got one response. “I wish you would have told me sooner. Don’t worry about getting a little behind. You’ve always been there for me, I am more than happy to cut you some slack and to help you in any way I can.”
This made me feel pretty good. I think of myself as a positive, helpful person. The responses I received when I shared a little bit about the craziness I’m dealing with in my personal life reinforced that others see me the same way. My network was there for me when I needed it, because I’ve been there for it.

Several years ago I participated in a writing project with my colleagues at the Creating WE Institute. I wrote a chapter for our book called “There Is No Quid Pro Quo in WE.” The idea in the chapter was simple. Do for others without expecting anything in return.
We live in a quid pro quo world. You do for me, and I’ll do for you. But if you want to build a strong network you need to turn it around. I’ll do for you regardless if you’ll do for me. As I learned recently, if you develop a reputation as a positive helpful person, other people will be there for you when you need them.

It also important to keep in touch with the folks in your network. A couple of years ago, I did a post on my personal blog that told the story of one of my friends who lost a job in mid-December. Even though he didn’t much feel like it, he kept a dinner date with a colleague that day. He told her about his job loss. Two days later she called him with a job lead. He began his new position in mid-January, at a better salary and commute. He would have never gotten this job had he blown off the dinner with his colleague. That shows you the importance of staying in touch with the people in your network.

Over the years I’ve had similar experiences. When I first started my consulting business, I would take a day every month to do nothing but make phone calls to friends and clients. I was amazed at how many times one of these conversations would lead to new business. After we chatted for a while, the person I called would say something like, “I’m glad you called, we have this project and you would be perfect for it. I wasn’t thinking of you until you called.” Now I stay in touch with friends and clients via email and through posts on the LinkedIn groups to which I belong more than the phone, but the idea is the same – stay in touch with the members of your network. It will be there when you need it.
In summary, while it’s important to build your network – work LinkedIn, attend events etc. – it’s more important to brand yourself as a positive, helpful person with the members of your network. It’s even more important to stay in touch with them. Put these ideas to work and you’ll be on the road to the successful and fulfilling career you deserve.

For more information on having Bud as a Coach – visit http://careerhmo.com/coach/bud-bilanich/

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Based on your experience, what do you think a managers pet peeve is and how can an employee avoid those pet peeves? http://careerhmo.com/based-on-your-experience-what-do-you-think-a-managers-pet-peeve-is-and-how-can-an-employee-avoid-those-pet-peeves/ http://careerhmo.com/based-on-your-experience-what-do-you-think-a-managers-pet-peeve-is-and-how-can-an-employee-avoid-those-pet-peeves/#comments Thu, 19 Mar 2015 17:30:32 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2143 interviewDanRedler-HeadshotDan Redler

Managers really dislike employees: who don’t take responsibility for their actions, who whine and complain regularly but never have any solutions, and who constantly challenge authority.

Employees who find themselves causing these specific pet peeves have a huge challenge. They must completely rewire themselves. They need to change their professional attitude and understand that the company and their managers are paying them for their services and, in exchange want, for lack of a better cliche, an honest day’s work in return. If an employee is the type of person who just can’t help being lethargic, negative and combative – they may benefit from seeking some counseling to work on their personality traits. If an employee is finding they display these behaviors because they really dislike the company, their managers and/or the work environment, they should quit and find a more suitable place to work.

Continuing to create friction between you and your managers is a ticket to never getting a promotion or getting fired.

In the workplace, just as in life, your “attitude determines your altitude.”   Learn more about Dan’s coaching here.

 

sueannphoto

Sueann Snodgrass


It is important that employees understand their managers pet peeves and know how to avoid them.  In my experience, some top pet peeves of managers include: drama at work, laziness, and being unprepared.  Some ways to avoid these pet peeves include coming to work and focusing on work, not drama and gossip; taking initiative and being proactive, which helps one avoid drama and avoid seeming lazy at the same time.  Be prepared by organizing your day, properly prioritizing tasks and sticking with your daily plan.  These tips will help avoid these pet peeves and make for a smooth relationship between manager and employee.  Learn about Sueann’s coaching here. 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAJoel Caney

Time is a precious commodity for office managers, so anything that they perceive to be a waste of their time is an annoyance.  Asking too many questions, showing up to meetings unprepared, and general tardiness are examples of employee behavior that irk bosses to no end.  To ensure that the manager’s time is spent efficiently and productively, employees should do their best to complete as much work and research as possible on their own and/or with coworkers.  Being consistently punctual is also important!

Learn about Joel’s coaching here. 

 

 

Rich

 Rich Hernandez

I believe not taking accountability for your actions is big manager’s pet peeve. 
To avoid this, always take ownership of your actions. 
Your manager will appreciate your candor and honesty and it will prove that you are a valuable employee because you were upfront with them. 

Learn about Rich’s coaching here. 

 

 

Fred Burch

Fred Burch

From my experience, the most common pet peeve of a manager is having subordinates bring problems to the attention of the manager without giving any thought to how the problem could be corrected.

Eldridge Cleaver said, “You either have to be part of the solution, or you’re going to be part of the problem”, and I think most managers would agree with this; without a solution, you will probably be perceived as part of the problem.

When you become aware of a problem, take the time to fully understand it and come up with several ways the problem could be dealt with before you talk with your manager. Your manager may not take any of your suggestions, but at least you will be perceived as part of the solution and not part of the problem.

 Learn about Fred’s coaching here. 

 

Howard AlexanderHoward Alexander

In my best opinion one pet peeve manager’s would say about some employees would be that they may be afraid to ask for feedback.

As an employee, setting some defined goals you would like to accomplish each year would be important. Then what you can do is ask your manager for feedback during each meeting. This will show your manager that you are always looking to improve as well as you are also holding yourself accountable to grow as a professional. Remember feedback is good and not always a negative thing.

Learn about Howard’s coaching here.

 

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I am in my 50′s. Is it too late to make a career transition? http://careerhmo.com/i-am-in-my-50s-is-it-too-late-to-make-a-career-transition/ http://careerhmo.com/i-am-in-my-50s-is-it-too-late-to-make-a-career-transition/#comments Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:43:17 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2136 olderworkerLisa

Lisa Adams

It is never too late to make a career transition.  Remember you have value!!!  Don’t let others tell you, you can’t do something.  Know what you want to do, figure out what skills you’ll need to get there and go for it.  The beauty of a coach, is they can give you objective advice and helpful resources to get moving towards your goal.

 
 

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here.
 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

It’s never too late to do anything.  Making a career transition in your 50′s takes some work but it can be done.  Just remember a few things…

– Build your online presence.  Create a great LinkedIn profile.  Join groups in your industry (or the industry you want to join).  Respond to posts in these groups.  Get known by the people who are doing what you want to do.

– Network.  Get in touch with old connections that you have let lapse.  Let these folks know that you are in the process of changing careers.  Ask for introductions to their connections.

– Keep your resume to no more than two pages.  Focus on the jobs and experience that make you an attractive candidate for positions in the field or industry you want to join.

– Realize that you may have to take a pay cut — especially if you’re moving into a completely different field.  Don;t let your ego get the best of you.

– Keep at it.  Plan your job search, then work your plan.  You’ll succeed.     Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.

 

Kristen Burke

It is never too late the make a career transition. It is crazy to me to think they what we do in our 20s and 30s will be a fit for us in our 50s or 60s. We also have so many people who aren’t thinking of retiring in the traditional sense but making career transitions to fit the lifestyle they are looking for.I think the best part of transitioning later in your career is that you have many skills and experiences that you can bring to your new position. I have had clients looking to make transitions later in their career because they have realized that the job they are currently in is not a good fit for them or they do not have a work life balance that they are seeking. The important thing to think about when making a career transition is that you want to focus on your unique skill or the problem you love to solve and leverage that skill in the next career. Make  a list of the transferable skills you have acquired and see how you can apply them to your new career.      Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

I love this question. It can be scary thinking of changing careers at any age. As we advance in our careers our goals and objective change and this can lead to the need to look for a different career path. The best thing to do is inventory all your transferable skills and see what areas you can use these skills. This will make a much easier transition. Look at the skills or training you are lacking and take classes and maybe do some volunteer work to gain some experience in your new targeted area. Also Network, Network and Network in the new field you are looking to move to. It just takes a plan and the confidence you can succeed.

Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

 

Kitty BoitnottKitty small

I don’t believe it is ever too late to career transition. I say that, however, with the caveat that it must be something you are fully committed to doing.  I transitioned from one job to another in my mid-50′s after earning a doctorate at the age of 55 (I didn’t start the doctoral program until I was 50) and I started my current enterprise as a coach and entrepreneur at the age of 60. In my opinion, it is not just a cliche that 60 is the new 40…in many ways it really is. If you are still healthy, feel energetic, and have the will to do it, making any life change in your 50′s is possible…including transitioning careers!

Learn about Kitty’s coaching here
 
 

Liz-small-150x150

 
 
 

Elizabeth Dexter- Wilson

 

It is never too late to become the person you want to be. And, that includes the professional you want to become. Therefore, why not go for what you want regardless of your age? Here are two questions to ask yourself:

 

1)      Do I want to turn 65 years old being the professional I dreamed of becoming? Or,
2)      Do I want to turn 65 years old never having become the professional I dreamed of being?

 

You can’t stop age 65 from arriving, so why not use that time to your advantage. Take the initiative to learn the strategies of how to transition to a new career. CareerHMO is here to help. I hope to see you soon!    Learn about Liz’s coaching here.

 

 

 

 

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How can I build my confidence up? I am not feeling great about myself since losing my job. What are some things I can do to feel better moving forward? http://careerhmo.com/how-can-i-build-my-confidence-up-i-am-not-feeling-great-about-myself-since-losing-my-job-what-are-some-things-i-can-do-to-feel-better-moving-forward/ http://careerhmo.com/how-can-i-build-my-confidence-up-i-am-not-feeling-great-about-myself-since-losing-my-job-what-are-some-things-i-can-do-to-feel-better-moving-forward/#comments Thu, 19 Feb 2015 19:28:27 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2131 DanRedler-HeadshotDan Redler

To gain momentum and feel better in your job search you need to identify where you are and determine where you want to go. Then, lose the negative self-talk and replace it with positive, action-oriented thoughts. Now turn the new thoughts into positive actions. In short, you have to “Do the Work”.

One of the great things about the JSAP program is that it provides a roadmap to self-confidence. If you commit to it  and go through each module diligently and in the order  presented, you will discover positive things about yourself that will motivate you and you will feel better as you complete each step.

Learn more about Dan’s coaching here.

 

 

Pamela RyanPam Ryan

Losing a job, involuntary or voluntary, with a gap in employment, is never an easy life transition. It is unsettling, shakes-up your world, and is downright scary.  You may want to understand “Why me?”, when in reality, it is most likely not about you.  You need to refocus your energy! Take a moment and just breathe. Plan coffee meetings with friends – keep positive people around you. Self assess in our program! , and finally  – network! Networking will get you meeting new people – its all about engaging with others to get to that next career! What an exciting journey this can be!

  Learn more about Pam’s coaching here.

 

 

 

Howard AlexanderHoward Alexander

Building your confidence when losing your job can be one of the toughest things you must try to overcome. One thing you could do is surround yourself around a positive support group. This group will not allow you to put yourself down, they are there to lift you up and push you to get back on your feet. Also, understand throughout your time in your previous position you have developed many skills that you can be applied to your future position. However even more importantly, this is THE TIME FOR YOU TO REINVENT YOU and start a new path. Sounds exciting right; it can be exciting, challenge and frustrating all at once.  But as your confidence grows so will the rewards that come with it.ward

 Learn more about Howard’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

sueannphoto

Sueann Snodgrass

The key is rebuilding confidence after job loss is to mentally keep the right frame of mind in order to consistently keep on moving forward.  Work on yourself, improving your skills or learning something new that you can add to your resume.  Be mindful of your thoughts and be purposeful in your actions you take each day in order to move forward in your personal and professional life.

Learn about Sueann’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAJoel Caney

A great way to build and maintain confidence is to stay active mentally and physically, which will increase the positive vibes that surround you.  Mentally, work to eliminate the negative self-talk in your head by surrounding yourself with positive influences, whether they be the people you associate with, the books and articles you read, or the podcasts you listen to.  Physically, a healthy diet, regular exercise, and daily meditation do wonders for maintaining a positive attitude and boosting the self-confidence you require for getting your career back on track.

Learn about Joel’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

Cindi Wariwan

 Cindi Wirawan
Here are some practical ideas to feel better moving forward. Take stock of your strengths and achievements. Keep a gratitude journal, or count your blessings. Go through the Confidence Project. Start volunteering. Go travelling or do something you’ve always wanted to do, and come back refreshed and energised. Hang out with positive people, such as the crew at CareerHMO who are going through the same journey as you. And if that’s still not enough, work with a career coach who can help you boost your confidence and encourage you when the going gets tough.

 Learn about Cindi’s coaching here. 

 

 

Rich

 Rich Hernandez

-Don’t beat yourself up over mistakes or failures

Take accountability, learn from the failures and mistakes and use what you learned to move forward in completing your tasks and goals.

-Say what you mean, mean what you say.

Be assertive and be confident in what you say and how you communicate with others.

-Take advantage of your strengths and use those strengths to help you improve your opportunity areas.

-Take a deep breath, and keep a positive outlook.

As you talk to people, they should be able to feel your positive nature as well as your confidence.   Learn about Rich’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

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There is a position open in my company that I would like to apply for. What is the best way to stand out from the competition? http://careerhmo.com/there-is-a-position-open-in-my-company-that-i-would-like-to-apply-for-what-is-the-best-way-to-stand-out-from-the-competition/ http://careerhmo.com/there-is-a-position-open-in-my-company-that-i-would-like-to-apply-for-what-is-the-best-way-to-stand-out-from-the-competition/#comments Thu, 05 Feb 2015 22:35:00 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2077 Lisa

Lisa Adams

The first step in making sure you stand out from the competition for a job inside your current company is to be “rock star” in your current role.  Understand your value, specifically your brand.  If you don’t know what your current brand is, now is the time to figure it out. Not only does our brand help us to get hired it also helps us to move through an organization

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here.
 

 

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

The best way to position yourself for a promotion — or a lateral move — inside your company is simple.  Demonstrate your commitment to your company. Brand yourself as someone who is a dedicated professional.  Produce high quality work.  Take on tough assignments.  Get involved with charitable causes your company supports.

Do these things now, so that when an opportunity comes up in the future you will have put yourself ahead of your competition.

  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.


 

 

Kristen Burke

If the position is in your current company you should take the opportunity to do some internal networking. Reach out to people you know who are in the department. Chances are that you could get some inside information about the position so you could write a 30-60-90 day plan of what you would accomplish in your first 90 days in that position. Even though you have the inside track, make sure you update your resume and LinkedIn profile. Also take the time to write a killer cover letter, highlighting your connection to the position and company

 

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

The best way to stand out is to show how you do more than is expected of you in your current position. Show how you are part of the company and work to its overall success. Make it clear you understand how the new position fits into the company and how you can make a difference. Never say anything bad about your current department and put the emphasis on the reasons why the open position is a great move for you and the new department.

Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

Kitty BoitnottKitty small

The best way to stand out is to show how you do more than is expected of you in your current position. Show how you are part of the company and work to its overall success. Make it clear you understand how the new position fits into the company and how you can make a difference. Never say anything bad about your current department and put the emphasis on the reasons why the open position is a great move for you and the new department.”

Learn about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

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How do mentors make a difference in my job search? How do I find one? http://careerhmo.com/how-do-mentors-make-a-difference-in-my-job-search-how-do-i-find-one/ http://careerhmo.com/how-do-mentors-make-a-difference-in-my-job-search-how-do-i-find-one/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:59:32 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2070 Lisa

Lisa Adams

Having a mentor assist you in a job search, adds not only support, but also a “reality check”. Mentors guide and should give honest practical advice in 2 areas. They can help in vetting out your direction.  They can guide you in navigating connections and timing in reaching out to connections. Do not expect your mentor to give you all their contacts.  That would be unfair to them and possibly very uncomfortable. Be sure to develop a job search plan along with target job and target companies, then ask their advice or feedback.

 

To find a mentor, be on the look out for professionals with similar values to yours and someone you admire.  Be sure you admire them for the right reasons not just their job title or how much money they make.  Lastly you have to make sure that if they give you advice, that this is someone whose advice you will heed.

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here.

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

The old saying “a mentor’s hindsight can become your foresight” is especially true when it comes to job hunting.  A good mentor will share his or her stories with you — stories of triumph (landing the job) and stories of failure (not getting an interview, not getting the job after a promising interview).  The lessons your mentor learned along the way and passes on to you can help you have more triumphs and fewer failures.

Listen to the stories your mentor tells you about his or her job searches.  Ask for the lessons behind these stories.  Put the lessons to work in your job search.

The best way to find a mentor is to look around you and identify the people you admire. Initiate a relationship with them.  Don’t ask then to mentor you immediately. Let the relationship grow before you begin asking for favors.

  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.


Mentors are a great resource for information during your job search! You should tap into your mentor’s knowledge about things like the current climate in your field of work, changes they see,companies they think are staying ahead of the curve and how they got to where they are today. The best way to find a mentor is to research someone in your field who you admire or reach out to past colleagues or bosses who you want to emulate. Once you have found that person, don’t be afraid to ask them to be your mentor. It will be a great boost to their ego and I can’t imagine that they wouldn’t be flattered that you asked. Make sure that you utilize the time you will have with your mentor wisely, have an agenda of what you want to discuss and questions to ask ahead of time.

 

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

“Mentors are a great help in your job search. They are more than just a network connection, they are someone you have develop a long term professional relationship with. The mentor has a clear understanding of your career goals and the steps it takes to get there. They help by giving your job search more focus and extend good council. Some Alumni organization and some larger companies run mentoring programs and can be a good source. If you are going to look on your own look for someone you admire and respect. Maybe someone in a position you want to get to at some point. It can be someone in you company or outside. Know what you want to get from the mentoring relationship. It is important that both of you have a clear understanding of the process and what both wants to get out of it.”

Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

Kitty BoitnottKitty small

Mentors can really make a difference in your job search because they can offer advice and perspective that you don’t yet have. The best way to find one is to ask! If you are looking to go into a field or start a career that is different from your previous positions, then research your new area of interest and find the people who are experts in that field. Reach out to them and ask them if they are open to allowing you to learn from them by asking questions and following their work. Most people will be flattered and will want to help. If they say they are too busy, then keep looking, but look for people who can really help you transition into the field in which you are interested and want to break into.

Learn about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

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What is the Best Way to Ask for an Informational Interview? http://careerhmo.com/what-is-the-best-way-to-ask-for-an-informational-interview/ http://careerhmo.com/what-is-the-best-way-to-ask-for-an-informational-interview/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 20:42:20 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2062 Informationalinterview

Lisa

Lisa Adams

I have found the best way to ask for an informational interview is of course following the start of connection via LinkedIn or other resource.  It would be good to have had at least one email interaction beyond an introduction, such as sending a content rich article to help them.

After that, THEN, I would email them to simply state, “I am interested in learning more about how you started in your current company and / or role.  I am looking into making a switch (in job or company).  Would you be available for a either a 20 -30 minute phone call or to meet in person for coffee?  Specifically I would like to learn …”(state a question about their background that could help start the conversation and give the person you want to meet with an idea of what you are looking for)

Suggest some dates and time or pockets of time that could work.  Ask them what would work for them and then thank them for their time.  I have seen this work many times. The knowledge gained in an informational interview is invaluable.

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2Bud Bilanich

The best way to ask for an informational interview is simple.  Be upfront and straightforward. Tell the person you’re contacting that you think he or she works for a great company and you are interested in learning more about them.  Then ask if you can meet with him or her to discuss his or her experience in working for the company,  It’s that simple.

Here’s a phone script, that can also be used as an email.

 

Hello John (or Jane):

We are connected on LinkedIn.  From my research I see that you work for XYZ company.  I’ve always admired your company.  I would like to learn more about it from somebody who has first hand experience.  I’d appreciate it if you would be willing to chat with me about your experiences working for XYZ company. Here are a few days and times I am available.  Does one of these work for you?  If not, please suggest an alternative and I will do my best to make it work.  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.

 

Kitty Boitnott

Approach someone you know or you have been introduced to if possible and ask if they would be able to offer 30 minutes of their valuable time to tell you a little about what it is like to work for Company XYZ. Don’t put any pressure on the individual you are asking. If they agree, they are doing you a favor. And it might help to consider it a conversation as opposed to an “interview.” The word, “interview” puts a certain amount of pressure on it that doesn’t need to be involved. You are looking for information…you are not yet looking for a job.

   Learn about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

Liz-small-150x150

Liz Dexter Wilson

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Informational Interviews are imperative to beginning the networking process. Why? Because the process of networking is all about the following; identifying your industry of interest, targeting companies that resonate with you, locating interesting individuals within those companies and initiating conversations that build professional relationships. Once these steps are completed, asking for Informational Interviews will be the next step.

 

Keep in mind that an Informational Interview will most likely be the first impression you make upon a professional. Therefore, you must have a strong strategy in how you present yourself. Once you have thoroughly researched the individuals you want to initiate conversations with, contact each of them via e-mail or LinkedIn. Your message must explain why you find their professional experience compelling. Tell them your interest in the industry and explain that you are in the process of collecting as much information about this industry as possible. Then, ask each professional if they are willing to meet with you to discuss their career path and their experience within the industry. Offer to pay for coffee or lunch and let each professional know you are happy to assist him/her in return. This strategy will guarantee a positive first impression and will most likely land you several Informational Interviews.

 Learn about Liz’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

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How can I most effectively connect with a job post through my cover letter? http://careerhmo.com/how-can-i-most-effectively-connect-with-a-job-post-through-my-cover-letter/ http://careerhmo.com/how-can-i-most-effectively-connect-with-a-job-post-through-my-cover-letter/#comments Thu, 15 Jan 2015 17:57:58 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2046 coverletterwcoffee

 

 

 

LisaLisa Adams

To most effectively “connect” with a job post I would say to research the organization as much as you can. It is crucial to understand the organization and how they resonate with you in order to create the best cover letter. Also I would, in choosing an accomplishment to highlight in a cover letter, lean towards a skill that the job post requires. Demonstrating you can add value to the organization through key skills.    Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here.

 

 

 

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2Bud Bilanich

This one is a no brainer.  My best advice is to create a disruptive cover letter as described in JSAP Module 14. Highlight a connection you have to the company or one of its products. It you have no connection to the company or one of its products, highlight the connection you have to the type of work you’ll be doing.

One of my clients created an absolutely brilliant disruptive cover letter by beginning with his experience on an aircraft carrier.  He described the dynamic and somewhat unsafe environment, and what he learned about industrial safety from this experience.  His voer letter and resume got him an interview and he landed a job as an Environment, Health and Safety professional with a large company.

  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.


 

 

Kristen Burke

The cover letter is a great place to showcase your connection and enthusiasm for the company you are applying to. Your resume tells them why you are qualified for the position but your cover letter should tell them why you belong there. Telling a story of how you are connected to the company is a great way to start.  You want your story to make them feel like you are already part of the team. Have attention grabbing headlines and keep it to one story so the cover letter is better focused. 

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

Kitty Boitnott

Effectively connect with a job post through your cover letter by creating a connection and telling your story utilizing the keywords from the job description. Make sure you use the keywords from the posting to describe your experience. By demonstrating that you know and understand what the job would entail based on your understanding of the job description and your own experience, you can create the connection that the reader will need to make between you and the open position.   Learn about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

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Liz Dexter Wilson

Applying directly to a job posting is a huge challenge and rarely results in success. Therefore, the cover letter is your greatest opportunity to stand out from the crowd. Unlike your resume’-a facts based document-your cover letter allows you to capture the reader’s attention by connecting your unique value with the requirements for the job. However, the most important component of your cover letter is telling your story. Providing a compelling story that tells the reader why this is the company for you, how you fit their mission and why this position appeals to you, will get you the attention you deserve.    Learn about Liz’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

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I’m “crushing” on a company and I have been turned down for the position in which I just interviewed. How can I keep on this company’s radar for future job opportunities? http://careerhmo.com/im-crushing-on-a-company-and-i-have-been-turned-down-for-the-position-in-which-i-just-interviewed-how-can-i-keep-on-this-companys-radar-for-future-job-opportunities/ http://careerhmo.com/im-crushing-on-a-company-and-i-have-been-turned-down-for-the-position-in-which-i-just-interviewed-how-can-i-keep-on-this-companys-radar-for-future-job-opportunities/#comments Thu, 11 Dec 2014 19:04:11 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2006           

LisaLisa Adams

In order to keep your connections to this company take the lack of an offer in stride. I know it is difficult especially when a “job crush” is involved.  You’ll want to thank them for the opportunity.  Let them know you would like to be considered again as a viable candidate when and if the right position comes along. By taking the high road you are showing the organization that you are a mature professional and that you are truly interested in their company.
On the positive side you learned more about the company  having gone through the process AND you have more connections there than you did before.  Give it about a month then reconnect with your contacts by simply sending an email.  Say hello, hope you are well and send along an interesting article that could be helpful to them.

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here.

Bud Bilanich

bb head shot suzanne 4:2It’s tough to interview and not get the job — especially if the company is high on your bucket list.  The best thing you can do is to stay in touch.  Send a handwritten note to the hiring manager and internal recruiter of HR person thanking them for the opportunity to interview and expressing your disappointment in not getting the job.  Tell them that you really want to work for their company. Ask for their feedback on what you can do to make yourself a better candidate the next time around.

Then borrow a page from the marketing handbook.  Build TOMA — Top Of Mind Awareness — with the company.  Stay in touch with the internal recruiter or HR person.  Send him or her an email once a quarter, reminding him or her that you’re still interested in the company and asking if he or she is currently recruiting for any jobs for which you are qualified.
Finally, while this may seem to be your dream company, don’t abandon your efforts to land a position with the other companies on your bucket list.  Keep your job search active.

  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.


It can be very disappointing to be turned down for a position with a company you love. Make sure to thank them for their time and consideration. Let them know you are still interested in the company if something becomes available. I would also see if they can give you any suggestions to help increase your chances of getting a position in the future. Make sure you stay in touch with the people you met in the company with a monthly email with an article they might be interested in or other valuable information you could share. You want to be the first person they think of when something becomes available and who knows, they may create a position for you if they see your continued enthusiasm and professionalism.

 

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

It is always hard when we get turned down for a position at a company we are excited about. The best thing to do is to follow up with thank you’s for the opportunity to interview for the position. Let them know you are very excited about the company and would like to be considered for future positions that would match your background. I would ask the best way to for you to say in touch with them. Keep following the company and staying in touch with your contacts throughout the company. Being positive is always the best approach. You never know if the person hired might not work out and you could be called.

Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

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Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

The bad news is that you did not get the job. However, there is still good news! Since you were a top candidate, you have already established the beginnings of a strong professional relationship with this company. Take advantage of this! Establish a schedule that includes one e-mail per month with the individuals who interviewed you. Your e-mail must be strategic and not just a brief “I wanted to touch base” message. Instead, share strong industry information such as articles or blog posts that you believe will resonate with them. Let them know your thoughts and ideas on these articles as well. This strategy allows you to continue a dialogue and demonstrate your unique gifts.  Learn about Liz’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have made it to the final interview. What can I do to close and get hired? http://careerhmo.com/i-have-made-it-to-the-final-interview-what-can-i-do-to-close-and-get-hired/ http://careerhmo.com/i-have-made-it-to-the-final-interview-what-can-i-do-to-close-and-get-hired/#comments Mon, 08 Dec 2014 15:17:02 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2001

Liz-small-150x150
Liz Dexter-Wilson
If you have made it to the final interview, you are most definitely at the top of the list for obtaining the job. Therefore, take advantage of this interview by corresponding as if you already have the job. Consider this your final consultation with the decision makers and, prior to the interview, prepare an outline describing what you plan to accomplish in your first 3 months. Then, during your interview, share and discuss this plan with the decision makers to engage and consult them further. This will give you an edge in sharing your plans to be the “aspirin for their pain”.

 

 

 

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich
Congratulations, you’ve made it this far. Approach the interview with a sense of confidence.  They definitely consider you to be a strong candidate.  Prepare for the interview as you wold any other.  Anticipate the questions you are likely to be asked — this should be easier this time around as you have some experience with the company’s interviewing practices — and prepare your answers.  Role play with a friend until your answers come off your tongue naturally.  Think about the questions you have abut the position and company.  Put together a list of questions you want to ask in the interview.  Avoid questions about salary, benefits, vacation, holidays etc.  There will be plenty of time to ask those types of questions once you have a firm offer.
Finally, show up for the interview convinced that you are the best person for the job — and let your confidence show.  Good luck.  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

First it is great to have reached this level in the process. At this point you know pretty well what the hot buttons are for the company with this position so emphasize the skills that fill those needs. Also it is good to ask if there is anything else you can answer for them about your skills and how they fit for this position. Having some good questions about the company will show your knowledge of them. Then just relax and show how you are the perfect candidate!!          Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

Lisa AdamsLisa

When you are one of the final candidates and are going into a final round of interviews, there are 2 key factors to remember.
First, by this point in the process you have proven you can do the job. The final choice will come down to, who is most compatible with the team. Are you a team player and will you truly mesh with the group.
A tactic to help here is to continue to remember you are in an interview but get to know the hiring manager / team better.  Smile be friendly.  Speak to them as future colleagues and people you enjoy being around.
Secondly, the company wants to know which of the final candidates “gets it”, gets what this company is about, and is a part of their tribe. A tactic to use is to remember what got you excited about the company in the first place and what have you learned throughout the interview process. Speak to this in your interview. Learn about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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