CareerHMO http://careerhmo.com Career Coaching for Job Search Mon, 15 Dec 2014 17:19:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 I’m “crushing” on a company and I have been turned down for the position in which I just interviewed. How can I keep on this company’s radar for future job opportunities? http://careerhmo.com/im-crushing-on-a-company-and-i-have-been-turned-down-for-the-position-in-which-i-just-interviewed-how-can-i-keep-on-this-companys-radar-for-future-job-opportunities/ http://careerhmo.com/im-crushing-on-a-company-and-i-have-been-turned-down-for-the-position-in-which-i-just-interviewed-how-can-i-keep-on-this-companys-radar-for-future-job-opportunities/#comments Thu, 11 Dec 2014 19:04:11 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2006           

LisaLisa Adams

In order to keep your connections to this company take the lack of an offer in stride. I know it is difficult especially when a “job crush” is involved.  You’ll want to thank them for the opportunity.  Let them know you would like to be considered again as a viable candidate when and if the right position comes along. By taking the high road you are showing the organization that you are a mature professional and that you are truly interested in their company.
On the positive side you learned more about the company  having gone through the process AND you have more connections there than you did before.  Give it about a month then reconnect with your contacts by simply sending an email.  Say hello, hope you are well and send along an interesting article that could be helpful to them.

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here.

Bud Bilanich

bb head shot suzanne 4:2It’s tough to interview and not get the job — especially if the company is high on your bucket list.  The best thing you can do is to stay in touch.  Send a handwritten note to the hiring manager and internal recruiter of HR person thanking them for the opportunity to interview and expressing your disappointment in not getting the job.  Tell them that you really want to work for their company. Ask for their feedback on what you can do to make yourself a better candidate the next time around.

Then borrow a page from the marketing handbook.  Build TOMA — Top Of Mind Awareness — with the company.  Stay in touch with the internal recruiter or HR person.  Send him or her an email once a quarter, reminding him or her that you’re still interested in the company and asking if he or she is currently recruiting for any jobs for which you are qualified.
Finally, while this may seem to be your dream company, don’t abandon your efforts to land a position with the other companies on your bucket list.  Keep your job search active.

  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.


It can be very disappointing to be turned down for a position with a company you love. Make sure to thank them for their time and consideration. Let them know you are still interested in the company if something becomes available. I would also see if they can give you any suggestions to help increase your chances of getting a position in the future. Make sure you stay in touch with the people you met in the company with a monthly email with an article they might be interested in or other valuable information you could share. You want to be the first person they think of when something becomes available and who knows, they may create a position for you if they see your continued enthusiasm and professionalism.

 

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

It is always hard when we get turned down for a position at a company we are excited about. The best thing to do is to follow up with thank you’s for the opportunity to interview for the position. Let them know you are very excited about the company and would like to be considered for future positions that would match your background. I would ask the best way to for you to say in touch with them. Keep following the company and staying in touch with your contacts throughout the company. Being positive is always the best approach. You never know if the person hired might not work out and you could be called.

Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

Liz-small-150x150

Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

The bad news is that you did not get the job. However, there is still good news! Since you were a top candidate, you have already established the beginnings of a strong professional relationship with this company. Take advantage of this! Establish a schedule that includes one e-mail per month with the individuals who interviewed you. Your e-mail must be strategic and not just a brief “I wanted to touch base” message. Instead, share strong industry information such as articles or blog posts that you believe will resonate with them. Let them know your thoughts and ideas on these articles as well. This strategy allows you to continue a dialogue and demonstrate your unique gifts.  Learn about Liz’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/im-crushing-on-a-company-and-i-have-been-turned-down-for-the-position-in-which-i-just-interviewed-how-can-i-keep-on-this-companys-radar-for-future-job-opportunities/feed/ 0
I have made it to the final interview. What can I do to close and get hired? http://careerhmo.com/i-have-made-it-to-the-final-interview-what-can-i-do-to-close-and-get-hired/ http://careerhmo.com/i-have-made-it-to-the-final-interview-what-can-i-do-to-close-and-get-hired/#comments Mon, 08 Dec 2014 15:17:02 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=2001

Liz-small-150x150
Liz Dexter-Wilson
If you have made it to the final interview, you are most definitely at the top of the list for obtaining the job. Therefore, take advantage of this interview by corresponding as if you already have the job. Consider this your final consultation with the decision makers and, prior to the interview, prepare an outline describing what you plan to accomplish in your first 3 months. Then, during your interview, share and discuss this plan with the decision makers to engage and consult them further. This will give you an edge in sharing your plans to be the “aspirin for their pain”.

 

 

 

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich
Congratulations, you’ve made it this far. Approach the interview with a sense of confidence.  They definitely consider you to be a strong candidate.  Prepare for the interview as you wold any other.  Anticipate the questions you are likely to be asked — this should be easier this time around as you have some experience with the company’s interviewing practices — and prepare your answers.  Role play with a friend until your answers come off your tongue naturally.  Think about the questions you have abut the position and company.  Put together a list of questions you want to ask in the interview.  Avoid questions about salary, benefits, vacation, holidays etc.  There will be plenty of time to ask those types of questions once you have a firm offer.
Finally, show up for the interview convinced that you are the best person for the job — and let your confidence show.  Good luck.  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

First it is great to have reached this level in the process. At this point you know pretty well what the hot buttons are for the company with this position so emphasize the skills that fill those needs. Also it is good to ask if there is anything else you can answer for them about your skills and how they fit for this position. Having some good questions about the company will show your knowledge of them. Then just relax and show how you are the perfect candidate!!          Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

Lisa AdamsLisa

When you are one of the final candidates and are going into a final round of interviews, there are 2 key factors to remember.
First, by this point in the process you have proven you can do the job. The final choice will come down to, who is most compatible with the team. Are you a team player and will you truly mesh with the group.
A tactic to help here is to continue to remember you are in an interview but get to know the hiring manager / team better.  Smile be friendly.  Speak to them as future colleagues and people you enjoy being around.
Secondly, the company wants to know which of the final candidates “gets it”, gets what this company is about, and is a part of their tribe. A tactic to use is to remember what got you excited about the company in the first place and what have you learned throughout the interview process. Speak to this in your interview. Learn about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/i-have-made-it-to-the-final-interview-what-can-i-do-to-close-and-get-hired/feed/ 0
How does a job searcher handle the apparent slow down of activity around the holidays? http://careerhmo.com/how-does-a-job-searcher-handle-the-apparent-slow-down-of-activity-around-the-holidays-should-heshe-keep-at-it-with-more-or-less-full-momentum-or-take-a-break-thinking-that-nothing-is-going-to-happen/ http://careerhmo.com/how-does-a-job-searcher-handle-the-apparent-slow-down-of-activity-around-the-holidays-should-heshe-keep-at-it-with-more-or-less-full-momentum-or-take-a-break-thinking-that-nothing-is-going-to-happen/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 16:47:39 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1986  

Christmas

 

Lisa

Lisa Adams

What I have discovered is that the holidays are a perfect time to keep up your momentum in your job search. Organizations are still hiring during December and January.  Keep hitting your job search every day and take advantage of this time to meet with contacts either in you network or at target companies, in person. December is a fantastic time to do this.  In general most people’s work schedule slow.  Offer to take people for coffee. You may be surprised how much activity you can generate during this time of year.  

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

Even though the activity may seem to slow down around the holidays, I think that any ‘business of one’ knows that it’s important to always be proactive.  A great deal of activity is occurring during the holiday season and that activity can translate into ‘networking’ opportunities.  This may be formal or informal, but it ’tis the season, so let yourself have some fun!

Keep in mind that most hiring managers are working on budgets at year end.  They may not be hiring now, but they are putting together their needs for next year.  Your network can keep you in the loop on new activity.  While you are reaching out to catch up with (and stay in front of) your network, try to find some time to get together over the holidays.  If you can’t connect over the holidays, suggest getting together in the New Year.  This will help you stay positive during a stressful holiday season and keep the momentum going on your search efforts.

Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

 

 

Bud Bilanich

bb head shot suzanne 4:2

The holidays are a tough time to be looking for a job.  Businesses are wrapping up their year, making sure they hit their targets and make their numbers.  Hiring often falls to the wayside until the new year.

That being said, job seekers can use the time around the holidays to step back and reassess where they are in their search.  Here are some things you can do to keep your job search momentum during the holidays…

– Tweak your LinkedIn profile

– Review and revise your bucket list companies

– Continue networking, the holidays are a great time to reconnect or stay in touch with your network

– Reflect on what is going well and what is going not so well and adjust your search accordingly in the the new year.

– Take some time to reflect on your blessings, and approach the new year and your job search with a sense of gratitude.    Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.

 

Keep the momentum going! You never know when a company is going to need someone right away. I think job searching during the holidays is very similar to selling a house during the holidays, your first instinct is to stop and wait until the first of the year. I bought my house 2 weeks before Christmas because I needed a place to live. Companies will hire during the holidays because they need to fill a position. A bonus to this strategy is that there will be fewer applicants if a position opens up because your competition will be waiting until the new year.

 

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

There are a lot of things we can do to be effective in making connections on LinkedIn, the most important professional social media site ever. Joining groups, commenting on posts, being active and on and on all help. But I find the most single important way, and something so many of us do not do, is to personalize all our connection requests. The connection is not “computer to computer” or “account to account”, it is “person to person”. We need to make a real connection to a real person and have a real purpose for wanting to connect with them. This does two things for us, first we show by taking the time to personalize the request that we value them as a connection and second we increase the quality of our connections by adding people that add value to our network. After all, this is our goal, to have a strong functioning network on LinkedIn.

Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

Liz-small-150x150

Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

Regardless of whether you are in a job search, you are always in the process of building relationships. And, in order to build relationships that are genuine, it takes time. So, when it comes to building professional relationships, taking advantage of time will always give you an edge. Therefore, why not take advantage of the holidays to gain that edge and continue to build your alliances? Remember. During the holiday season, you don’t need to be heavily discussing your job search, your unique value and your “super powers” with your relationships. You can simply stay in touch, bond, think of ways to “pay it forward” and continue to be genuine.  Learn About Liz’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/how-does-a-job-searcher-handle-the-apparent-slow-down-of-activity-around-the-holidays-should-heshe-keep-at-it-with-more-or-less-full-momentum-or-take-a-break-thinking-that-nothing-is-going-to-happen/feed/ 0
I was laid off and have been out of work for over a year. How do I explain that in an interview? http://careerhmo.com/i-was-laid-off-and-have-been-out-of-work-for-over-a-year-how-do-i-explain-that-in-an-interview/ http://careerhmo.com/i-was-laid-off-and-have-been-out-of-work-for-over-a-year-how-do-i-explain-that-in-an-interview/#comments Tue, 18 Nov 2014 17:57:08 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1969

 

Lisa

Lisa Adams

When you have been laid off and it has been over a year, let people know 3 things in order to come across positively;

1. What you have learned about the job search and even how you have changed your tactics to show how you add value to prospective employers.

2. Not is a defensive manner, let them know what new skills you have learned in the year or what activities besides job search you have added to your life.  For instance, taking on a new hobby, increasing your health by replacing bad habits with new healthier ones, or volunteer work you have been able to do.

3.  Sometimes letting people know that the break, although longer than you anticipated, has been a good one.  A time for you to refresh, recharge, and be ready to take on new and bigger challenges.   Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

The good news about this question is that you have overcome the first hurdle, you have an interview!  Now, an important point when interviewing post a layoff that has turned into an extended period of unemployment is to be proactive.  You’ll need to be prepared to address why you were laid-off.  The best defense is always an offense, so be ready to present yourself well.  That means you’ll need to be positive and be able to paint the picture of what you have accomplished in the time since you were laid off.  Unemployed does not equate to inactive and you need to get that message across to your prospective employer.  Speak about all of the activities that you have engaged in during this period – training to enhance your knowledge base and skill set, active membership in associations that are related to your industry, volunteering in your community, church, local schools.  Perhaps you have been investigating a career transition that has brought you to this particular interview.  Emphasizing your activity networking and interviewing during this time can become an asset, as well, as your confidence builds through these experiences.

It’s up to you to facilitate the interview so that the interviewer receives as much information as possible about you and the value that you will add for them.

Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

Relax.  You’ve made it as far as the interview.  That means that the company is interested in you.  Go into the interview with confidence.

On the other hand, be prepared to answer a question about why you have been unemployed for the past 12 months.  You might say something like, “My company had a major downsizing, and I lost my job along with XXX of my coworkers.  I have been actively looking for the right opportunity since then.  I believe I’ve found it here.  I am very impressed with your company because…  I’m a great fit for this position because… I want to be able to make a contribution to what you’re doing.”

Notice how this answer acknowledges that you’ve been unemployed for a year.  But then it quickly moves to why you want to work for the company that is interviewing you and why you’re a good candidate. An answer like this puts you in charge of the interview.  You answer the question briefly and then move on to what you want to get across to the interviewer.

  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.


Honesty is the best policy. The question will come up when you are networking and in an interview. If the company you were working for had to downsize or went out of business you can tell the potential employer just that. If you were let go for a performance issue you can tell the potential employer how you have learned from that situation and what you will do differently in the future. Staying positive about your past employer is important and expressing the experience and lessons learned is a great way to do that.

 

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

There are a lot of things we can do to be effective in making connections on LinkedIn, the most important professional social media site ever. Joining groups, commenting on posts, being active and on and on all help. But I find the most single important way, and something so many of us do not do, is to personalize all our connection requests. The connection is not “computer to computer” or “account to account”, it is “person to person”. We need to make a real connection to a real person and have a real purpose for wanting to connect with them. This does two things for us, first we show by taking the time to personalize the request that we value them as a connection and second we increase the quality of our connections by adding people that add value to our network. After all, this is our goal, to have a strong functioning network on LinkedIn.

Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/i-was-laid-off-and-have-been-out-of-work-for-over-a-year-how-do-i-explain-that-in-an-interview/feed/ 0
Networking events make me nervous, what are other ways I can network? http://careerhmo.com/networking-events-make-me-nervous-what-are-other-ways-i-can-network/ http://careerhmo.com/networking-events-make-me-nervous-what-are-other-ways-i-can-network/#comments Tue, 11 Nov 2014 14:52:58 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1957

 

Kristen Burke

To make your LI connections really take shape, be sure to continue to nourish them once they are made.  Too often I see job seekers make a connection but then fail to follow up or continue the conversation.  Once they connect with you, send a “thank you for connecting” email via LinkedIn.  Keep it brief and sincere.  From there you can build up this “relationship”.  You now have their contact information and can send emails directly to them, outside of LI.

 

 

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

Events that are labeled as ‘networking’ events take on a heightened expectation on the part of a participant.  For someone who already is uncomfortable with the idea of ‘meeting and greeting’ strangers, this can be a difficult way to interact.

Strategies for, and alternatives to, attending networking events might include turning the tables.  Become an event organizer and you are more in control of the meet and greet.  Think of yourself as the host who wants everyone to have the best time.  You can also volunteer at a fundraising event for an organization that you support.  This may be a non-profit group, a charity, or even a corporate charity event.  You’ll  be part of the event and have a built-in reason to network with other participants.  It also gives you an opportunity to meet the organizers of the event at pre-event meetings.  Another added perk, volunteers are not paid but they are also welcome to attend the event for free!  Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2Bud Bilanich

Networking is not synonymous with event.  I think of networking as making friends.  I meet someone and my first thought is “What can I do to help this person?”  Usually it’s an introduction.  I make that introduction.  This giving with no expectation of return has allowed me to build a huge network of friends who I can call on when I need them.

Just last week, I was doing some research for a project that I’m starting.  I reached out to 30 of my friends — people in my network — and asked them to help me by answering two questions.  I heard from 28 of the 30 in 10 days time.

These people were willing to help me because I helped them first.  So my best advice is to take it one person at a time and be as helpful to as many people as you can.


Kitty small

Kitty Boitnott

 

For people who hate “networking events,” one way to network without considering it “networking” is to volunteer for a cause in which you believe. By doing that, you have the added benefit of working for something that is meaningful to you, but you also get to meet like minded people. As you add to your circle of friends and acquaintances, you may be surprised at the connections that you make that can potentially lead to other types of introductions that could ultimately assist you in your job search.

Learn more about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

John Toomeynew john

If you are nervous at pure networking events start off in situations you are more comfortable in. Alumni events are a great place that have a different focus but can be a perfect place to make connections. Professional events bring people together that have a lot of common interests and makes it easier to network. Events that have a speaker or presentation can give you some common topics to start conversations that can lead to a great connection. After a few of these events you will be a networking pro.

 Learn more about John’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/networking-events-make-me-nervous-what-are-other-ways-i-can-network/feed/ 0
How Do I Make Connections Most Effectively on LinkedIn? http://careerhmo.com/how-do-i-make-connections-most-effectively-on-linkedin/ http://careerhmo.com/how-do-i-make-connections-most-effectively-on-linkedin/#comments Tue, 04 Nov 2014 18:46:49 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1950

 

Lisa

Lisa Adams

To make your LI connections really take shape, be sure to continue to nourish them once they are made.  Too often I see job seekers make a connection but then fail to follow up or continue the conversation.  Once they connect with you, send a “thank you for connecting” email via LinkedIn.  Keep it brief and sincere.  From there you can build up this “relationship”.  You now have their contact information and can send emails directly to them, outside of LI.

 

 

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

Approach connecting on LinkedIN as the virtual networking conversation that it is and you’ll be able to build your online connections one step at a time.

Ask yourself who you’d like to get to know better?  Figure out why this person (?) and what/who you have in common.  Why do you think this person may be interested in connecting with you?  Are you ready to nurture the connection?  This will require a proactive approach when cultivating and then sustaining the connection.

Connecting at its best is a two way conversation that offers mutual benefits.  It doesn’t happen on its own, nor does it thrive in a vacuum.

This online connection is a beginning that will enable you to turn virtual into in-person connections!

Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

LinkedIn is a great tool for connecting with others, but only if you use it correctly.

First of all, make sure that you have a photo in your profile.  Most people will go to your profile when they receive your connection request.  A photo puts a face to the request — and may be the difference in your request being accepted or not.

Second, make sure that your summary is up to date and compelling.  People will be more likely to connect with you if they see you as an interesting person.

Third, always write a custom connection request.  Do not use the default LI request. It is too impersonal.  Tell the person how you know him or her and why you want to connect.  This takes only a few seconds but it establishes you as a genuine person who is interested in connecting with this specific person — not someone who is sending out bulk connection requests.

Finally, when you make a connection stay in touch.

  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.


Kitty small

Make the connections personal and meaningful. Simply asking for a connection for the sake of making the connection isn’t using LinkedIn effectively. Effective use means making the most of the connections by making them meaningful and purposeful.

 

Learn more about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

John Toomey 4

John Toomey

There are a lot of things we can do to be effective in making connections on LinkedIn, the most important professional social media site ever. Joining groups, commenting on posts, being active and on and on all help. But I find the most single important way, and something so many of us do not do, is to personalize all our connection requests. The connection is not “computer to computer” or “account to account”, it is “person to person”. We need to make a real connection to a real person and have a real purpose for wanting to connect with them. This does two things for us, first we show by taking the time to personalize the request that we value them as a connection and second we increase the quality of our connections by adding people that add value to our network. After all, this is our goal, to have a strong functioning network on LinkedIn.

Learn about John’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/how-do-i-make-connections-most-effectively-on-linkedin/feed/ 0
I have all the qualities listed in the job description but am terrible at interviewing. What can I do to improve my interviewing skills? http://careerhmo.com/i-have-all-the-qualities-listed-in-the-job-description-but-am-terrible-at-interviewing-what-can-i-do-to-improve-my-interviewing-skills/ http://careerhmo.com/i-have-all-the-qualities-listed-in-the-job-description-but-am-terrible-at-interviewing-what-can-i-do-to-improve-my-interviewing-skills/#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:33:17 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1937

 

 

 

KristinNew-01-1-150x150
Kristen Burke

Preparation is going to be key for improving your interview skills. Think about past questions you have been asked in interviews and write out the answers to those questions. Practice them in front of a friend and get their feedback. Make sure all of your answers are positive, no employer wants to hear negative things about your past employers or coworkers. One of the biggest mistakes I have seen is that job seekers make the interview about themselves instead of the employer. The employer wants to know how you will add value (and money) to their company. Preparation, practice, positive answers and showing how you will add value is the recipe for success.

 

Liz-small-150x150Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

Interviewing is not a test graded on getting the correct answer to each question. Interviewing is a conversation and consultation between professionals discussing a job opportunity. So, If you are terrible at interviewing, chances are, you have been perceiving the process as a test and not a conversation. Remember, the interviewer wants to know if you are the best fit for this position and you want to know where and how you fit in. From now on, when you are invited to an interview, approach the meeting with the expectation that you will learn as much about the company as the company will learn about you. This will be a meeting among two professionals with the same goal; finding the best fit.

Your first step in improving your interviewing skills is to find out everything possible about the company. Know it like the back of your hand. Then, identify how you fit into the mission, the culture and the position. What really “psychs you up” about the mission, culture and position? Then, identify some past stories and defining moments that best describe why you fit so well with this position and why you are so psyched up about working at this company. Also, prepare the questions that you need answered as well.

 

Many people believe they aren’t good at interviewing, and, let’s face it, even in the best of circumstances, it is mostly an awkward and uncomfortable experience. You feel like you are under a microscope, and every word and every gesture is likely to be judged and potentially used against you, right? You can’t relax and be yourself…or can you? My advice is to try to do exactly that. If you aren’t yourself and you get the job, you aren’t going to be happy for very long. Better to relax, be yourself and let the chips fall where they may. That is not to say you don’t put your best foot forward…but you want to make sure the foot you put forward is truly yours. That means practicing as much as possible so that you feel less stressed going in. Practice with a friend. Practice in front of a mirror. Practice smling. Practice good eye contact with strangers. Practice your handshake. Practice the answers to the questions you are most likely to be asked. Prepare to the extent that you can, and then try, to the extent that it is possible, to relax and be yourself. You will hate the process a lot less if you feel more comfortable, and that means rehearsing to the extent that you can and then going with the flow.  Learn about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 
bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

Interviewing is like any other skill. You can learn it and master it.  I did a blog post (www.BudBilanich.com/blog/) last week in which I laid out a three step approach to mastering any skill: Study, Observation, Practice.

The first thing you want to do is learn as much about interviewing skills as you can.  Do whatever it takes to get a grasp on the concepts associated with successful interviewing.

Then, go to the web and find videos that demonstrate good interviewing techniques.

Finally, practice.  Make a list of interview questions you anticipate and practice your answers — out loud. Find a role play partner who will work with you on improving your interviewing skills. In a recent Career HMO Office Hours two people offered to role play via Skype with a woman who wanted to improve her interviewing skills.  One last thing here.  Treat unsuccessful interviews as practice.  Reflect on what went well and what went poorly in an interview. Use this information to help you prepare better for the next on

If you follow these three simple steps — Study Observe, Practice — you’ll master the skills associated with interviewing and land your dream job.

 

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/i-have-all-the-qualities-listed-in-the-job-description-but-am-terrible-at-interviewing-what-can-i-do-to-improve-my-interviewing-skills/feed/ 0
In losing my job I have lost my confidence – how do I get it back? http://careerhmo.com/in-losing-my-job-i-have-lost-my-confidence-how-do-i-get-it-back/ http://careerhmo.com/in-losing-my-job-i-have-lost-my-confidence-how-do-i-get-it-back/#comments Tue, 14 Oct 2014 13:35:09 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1914

Lisa Lisa Adams When your confidence is lost, be sure to stay connected no matter how difficult it feels to do so. The core people you want to stay connected to are the encouragers in your life.  Those “bone marrow” people that will lift you up and remind you to say “ONWARD” when you don’t feel like going another step. We are not meant to be alone, either in life or job search. Our soul does not thrive when we are apart from others.  Find your encouragers, call them, meet them, and remember; you have value. Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

KristinNew-01-1-150x150

Kristen Burke

I have found that doing an assessment of your strengths is very helpful. It gets your mind moving in a positive direction. Ask friends and family what they think your strengths are. There are often strengths that you don’t see that others do. You can also reach out to past colleagues and ask for recommendation letters. Seeing the positive things others write about you is very empowering, you can go back and reread when you need a boost of confidence. Know that you are not alone, as I coach I see this everyday. The good news is that if you are reading this you are looking to make a positive change which is half the battle!
Anne Marie Cooley
ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1


Initially it’s understandable that you may want to throw a ‘pity party’ for yourself.  Keep it short and sweet (bittersweet?!).  Then, you’ll need to take stock of your situation.  What is the new normal in your career?  Much of how you’re feeling will depend upon a number of factors, e.g., your industry, your age, your network.
Today more than ever before you need to be proactive in your search and you need to connect.  You are your own subject matter expert.  Spend time reviewing those skills and strengths that make you an expert.
Everyone is a ‘business of one’ in today’s job market, so you’ll need to find the ways you can validate and market yourself.  For some it may mean initiating an online presence.  For others the online presence may exist but now needs nurturing.  For all, networking online and in-person is key.
If you are feeling insecure at first, consider volunteering.  Giving your time to a cause that you believe in will allow you to get outside of your own head while you are helping others!
Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.
 
new john
John Toomey
“First it is normal to feel this way especially if it comes unexpectedly. I always coach people to face their fears and take charge of their career. Inventory their skills, build a support network and get the help and skills they need to find that next position. Getting busy with the process and knowing they don’t have to do it alone helps build back that lost confidence.” Learn About John’s coaching here.
 
Bud Bilanich

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Losing a job can be a confidence killer.  I have three suggestions for rebuilding your self confidence. First stay optimistic.  Believe in your heart of hearts that things will work out, that you will find a new and better job. Then do the work you need to do to make your optimism come true. Second, spend time with positive people — those who build you up and help you feel good about yourself.  Avoid negative people.  They are energy black holes and will drag you down — but only if you let them. Third, face your fears and act.  If you’re shy, attend network events.  If you’re embarrassed about losing your job, tell your friends that you’ve lost your job and are looking.  Do things that scare you.  You’ll be surprised at how this will boost your confidence.    Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.     Liz-small-150x150Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson   Losing a job can take an emotional toll and it is important to allow yourself time to grieve and recover. Spend time with family, friends and mentors while you work through your emotions. However, make sure you do not neglect your professional community. Continue to participate in your regular professional routines including social media, relationship building, education and reading rituals. Your confidence will recover quicker when you maintain the professional routines that made you successful in the first place.  Learn more about Elizabeth Dexter-Wilsons coaching here.     Kitty small Kitty Boitnott . Confidence is an attitude–a frame of mind. We can sometimes feel on top of the world for no particular reason, and we can just as easily feel deflated even though nothing in particular happened to cause us to feel that way. Confidence is something that we have to work at holding onto, especially when life is challenging us, and let’s face it…the loss of a job is a challenge We are too quick in our society to confuse who we are with what we do. Your job doesn’t define you…you are defined by the strength of your character and the steadfastness of your relationships with yourself and others. For getting back confidence that is “lost” due to a job loss, I encourage my clients to remember each morning all that they have to be grateful for and to adopt a few encouraging affirmations that can help get them through the day. One of my personal favorites is “I am open and receptive to new avenues of income, and I turn every experience into an opportunity for growth.”  Learn about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/in-losing-my-job-i-have-lost-my-confidence-how-do-i-get-it-back/feed/ 0
I am an older worker and am experiencing age discrimination. How can I prove to employers that I am hireable? http://careerhmo.com/i-am-an-older-worker-and-am-experiencing-age-discrimination-how-can-i-prove-to-employers-that-i-am-hireable/ http://careerhmo.com/i-am-an-older-worker-and-am-experiencing-age-discrimination-how-can-i-prove-to-employers-that-i-am-hireable/#comments Thu, 09 Oct 2014 14:52:11 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1897

Lisa

Lisa Adams

The best approach to have while in the search process is to show you are teachable.  Is is one of the biggest challenges I see with older job seekers or even prior business owners.  The big hesitation that employers have is “he is so experienced or has owned a company before, he’ll never learn how to fit in or how to do the job the way we want it.”  Their fear is you will not be humble enough to learn from younger peers.  Learning should be a like long process, show that you are this kind of person and you will make a good impression.  Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

At the risk of sounding superficial, I would say that mature job seekers need to bear in mind that first impressions do count.  What’s most important at the end of the day is the experience and skills that you bring with you.  However, if you’re giving off ‘old’ signals, you are doing yourself a disservice.

I’m not suggesting that you try to look or act younger, rather I am encouraging you to be your sharpest you.  Bringing your ‘A’ game to every situation.

To that end … Check your look!  What’s your style?  What’s it saying about you?  Are you walking tall? Or do you shuffle into the room?
Check your language!  Notice I speak about a ‘mature’ job seeker, not older.  I’ve removed the expression ‘I’m old fashioned’ from my vocabulary. I’m proud of my age and enjoy it when people are surprised by it, but I don’t broadcast the number, at least not initially.  I learned a long time ago that people categorize you, so you need to define the category for them.Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

new john
 John Toomey

 

 

 

“The best thing to do is make sure you branded as a specialist and that you are a clear match for the position. Be sure to stay current in your field, show you can work well with wide age groups and be energetic. A super positive attitude can make a big difference.”

    Learn more about John’s coaching here.

Learn more about John’s coaching here.

 

 

 

Kitty Boitnott

I think the best way to prove your are hirable even though you may be an “older worker” is to demonstrate that you are still “trainable” and you aren’t still stuck in the past, unwilling to change with the times. Workers of all ages need to be flexible and must be willing to learn new skills in this new economy. Taking courses, earning certifications, or renewing licenses that may have expired are just a few ways that more veteran workers can demonstrate that they are still willing to learn, want to stay current and up to date with their skills, and that they would make valuable assets to any company lucky enough to have them.

Learn more about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/i-am-an-older-worker-and-am-experiencing-age-discrimination-how-can-i-prove-to-employers-that-i-am-hireable/feed/ 0
What happens if I botched a question in an interview? http://careerhmo.com/what-happens-if-i-botched-a-question-in-an-interview/ http://careerhmo.com/what-happens-if-i-botched-a-question-in-an-interview/#comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:58:07 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1863 frustrated

 

Lisa

Lisa Adams

Many times we don’t always notice during the interview that we are not being effective. Most of the time it is evaluated afterwards. But when the realization hits you during the interview, which is good, begin to adjust immediately. Here are some ways to do this.

Take a deep breath. Ask, “you know I really think I am not answering your question and I am sorry about for that. Can I quickly restate my answer again?”

Basically, regroup, apologize, and restate.

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

KristinNew-01-1-150x150

Kristen Burke

I had a client ask me this recently and it happens more often than you think. Even if you have prepared for every interview question you can think of there is always a wild card. There are a couple of things you can do to bounce back so don’t panic, your first instinct might be to crawl under your chair and die, fight the urge! If you realized your mistake while still in the interview let the interviewer know that you feel you could have answered one of the questions she asked better and ask if she has time for you to try again. Smile about it, the interviewer will not expect you to be perfect and will appreciate your ability to bounce back from your mistake. If you get home and feel you really botched a question you can let the interviewer know in the follow-up email. I would caution you to do this only if you made a big mistake. Do not use this strategy to make minor changes your answers or let negative self talk creep in and make you second guess your answers.

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

Liz-small-150x150

Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

Remember, if you think you have botched a question, it does not mean your interviewer thinks so too. So, be careful not to react immediately with apologies and/or embarrassment. If you feel you need to clarify or re-answer a question, bring it up at the end of the interview; preferably when the interviewer asks you if you have any questions. Start by mentioning you would like to add a few more comments related to an earlier question. Answer the question again based on the answer you truly want to give and then follow up with the questions you have.

For introverts like me, you will probably realize your potential “botches” after you are home from the interview. If this is the case, follow up with an e-mail, thank them for their time and tell them you have a few additional thoughts to share. Clarify the question you feel you “botched”, send off the e-mail and then, mail a separate thank you note to the interviewer.

 Learn more about Elizabeth’s coaching here

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

“If it is apparent to both you and the interviewer that your response has missed the mark, a direct approach is the most effective. As soon as there is an opening to do so, readdress the question that was posed and provide both your insight on what was being asked and why you think it deserves further consideration.

If it is more your perception that an answer went awry, tread more lightly when you circle back to readdress your point. A subtle rephrasing or redirect of your response can allow you to clarify the point and refine your answer without raising a red flag.”

   Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

 

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2

Bud BilanichDon’t let a botched answer to an interview question destroy the entire interview. I once was interviewing a guy who really made a mess of his answer to a question. He knew it and I knew it.
But he was smart. He said, “I really blew that question. Can I have another chance to answer it?”
I said yeas, of course.
He nailed it the second time around.
The lesson in this story is simple. Don’t be afraid to admit that you made a mistake, or blew it when you were answering a question. Ask for a second chance — and then knock it out of the park.
Most interviewers realize that interviewing is a stressful process and and are willing to cut you some slack.
If you meet an interviewer who won’t grant you this simple courtesy, you might want to rethink if you really want to join his or her company.

        Learn more about Bud’s coaching here. 

 

 

]]>
http://careerhmo.com/what-happens-if-i-botched-a-question-in-an-interview/feed/ 0