CareerHMO http://careerhmo.com Career Coaching for Job Search Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:33:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 I have all the qualities listed in the job description but am terrible at interviewing. What can I do to improve my interviewing skills? http://careerhmo.com/i-have-all-the-qualities-listed-in-the-job-description-but-am-terrible-at-interviewing-what-can-i-do-to-improve-my-interviewing-skills/ http://careerhmo.com/i-have-all-the-qualities-listed-in-the-job-description-but-am-terrible-at-interviewing-what-can-i-do-to-improve-my-interviewing-skills/#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:33:17 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1937

 

 

 

KristinNew-01-1-150x150
Kristen Burke

Preparation is going to be key for improving your interview skills. Think about past questions you have been asked in interviews and write out the answers to those questions. Practice them in front of a friend and get their feedback. Make sure all of your answers are positive, no employer wants to hear negative things about your past employers or coworkers. One of the biggest mistakes I have seen is that job seekers make the interview about themselves instead of the employer. The employer wants to know how you will add value (and money) to their company. Preparation, practice, positive answers and showing how you will add value is the recipe for success.

 

Liz-small-150x150Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

Interviewing is not a test graded on getting the correct answer to each question. Interviewing is a conversation and consultation between professionals discussing a job opportunity. So, If you are terrible at interviewing, chances are, you have been perceiving the process as a test and not a conversation. Remember, the interviewer wants to know if you are the best fit for this position and you want to know where and how you fit in. From now on, when you are invited to an interview, approach the meeting with the expectation that you will learn as much about the company as the company will learn about you. This will be a meeting among two professionals with the same goal; finding the best fit.

Your first step in improving your interviewing skills is to find out everything possible about the company. Know it like the back of your hand. Then, identify how you fit into the mission, the culture and the position. What really “psychs you up” about the mission, culture and position? Then, identify some past stories and defining moments that best describe why you fit so well with this position and why you are so psyched up about working at this company. Also, prepare the questions that you need answered as well.

 

Many people believe they aren’t good at interviewing, and, let’s face it, even in the best of circumstances, it is mostly an awkward and uncomfortable experience. You feel like you are under a microscope, and every word and every gesture is likely to be judged and potentially used against you, right? You can’t relax and be yourself…or can you? My advice is to try to do exactly that. If you aren’t yourself and you get the job, you aren’t going to be happy for very long. Better to relax, be yourself and let the chips fall where they may. That is not to say you don’t put your best foot forward…but you want to make sure the foot you put forward is truly yours. That means practicing as much as possible so that you feel less stressed going in. Practice with a friend. Practice in front of a mirror. Practice smling. Practice good eye contact with strangers. Practice your handshake. Practice the answers to the questions you are most likely to be asked. Prepare to the extent that you can, and then try, to the extent that it is possible, to relax and be yourself. You will hate the process a lot less if you feel more comfortable, and that means rehearsing to the extent that you can and then going with the flow.  Learn about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 
bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

Interviewing is like any other skill. You can learn it and master it.  I did a blog post (www.BudBilanich.com/blog/) last week in which I laid out a three step approach to mastering any skill: Study, Observation, Practice.

The first thing you want to do is learn as much about interviewing skills as you can.  Do whatever it takes to get a grasp on the concepts associated with successful interviewing.

Then, go to the web and find videos that demonstrate good interviewing techniques.

Finally, practice.  Make a list of interview questions you anticipate and practice your answers — out loud. Find a role play partner who will work with you on improving your interviewing skills. In a recent Career HMO Office Hours two people offered to role play via Skype with a woman who wanted to improve her interviewing skills.  One last thing here.  Treat unsuccessful interviews as practice.  Reflect on what went well and what went poorly in an interview. Use this information to help you prepare better for the next on

If you follow these three simple steps — Study Observe, Practice — you’ll master the skills associated with interviewing and land your dream job.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In losing my job I have lost my confidence – how do I get it back? http://careerhmo.com/in-losing-my-job-i-have-lost-my-confidence-how-do-i-get-it-back/ http://careerhmo.com/in-losing-my-job-i-have-lost-my-confidence-how-do-i-get-it-back/#comments Tue, 14 Oct 2014 13:35:09 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1914

Lisa Lisa Adams When your confidence is lost, be sure to stay connected no matter how difficult it feels to do so. The core people you want to stay connected to are the encouragers in your life.  Those “bone marrow” people that will lift you up and remind you to say “ONWARD” when you don’t feel like going another step. We are not meant to be alone, either in life or job search. Our soul does not thrive when we are apart from others.  Find your encouragers, call them, meet them, and remember; you have value. Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

KristinNew-01-1-150x150

Kristen Burke

I have found that doing an assessment of your strengths is very helpful. It gets your mind moving in a positive direction. Ask friends and family what they think your strengths are. There are often strengths that you don’t see that others do. You can also reach out to past colleagues and ask for recommendation letters. Seeing the positive things others write about you is very empowering, you can go back and reread when you need a boost of confidence. Know that you are not alone, as I coach I see this everyday. The good news is that if you are reading this you are looking to make a positive change which is half the battle!
Anne Marie Cooley
ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1


Initially it’s understandable that you may want to throw a ‘pity party’ for yourself.  Keep it short and sweet (bittersweet?!).  Then, you’ll need to take stock of your situation.  What is the new normal in your career?  Much of how you’re feeling will depend upon a number of factors, e.g., your industry, your age, your network.
Today more than ever before you need to be proactive in your search and you need to connect.  You are your own subject matter expert.  Spend time reviewing those skills and strengths that make you an expert.
Everyone is a ‘business of one’ in today’s job market, so you’ll need to find the ways you can validate and market yourself.  For some it may mean initiating an online presence.  For others the online presence may exist but now needs nurturing.  For all, networking online and in-person is key.
If you are feeling insecure at first, consider volunteering.  Giving your time to a cause that you believe in will allow you to get outside of your own head while you are helping others!
Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.
 
new john
John Toomey
“First it is normal to feel this way especially if it comes unexpectedly. I always coach people to face their fears and take charge of their career. Inventory their skills, build a support network and get the help and skills they need to find that next position. Getting busy with the process and knowing they don’t have to do it alone helps build back that lost confidence.” Learn About John’s coaching here.
 
Bud Bilanich

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Losing a job can be a confidence killer.  I have three suggestions for rebuilding your self confidence. First stay optimistic.  Believe in your heart of hearts that things will work out, that you will find a new and better job. Then do the work you need to do to make your optimism come true. Second, spend time with positive people — those who build you up and help you feel good about yourself.  Avoid negative people.  They are energy black holes and will drag you down — but only if you let them. Third, face your fears and act.  If you’re shy, attend network events.  If you’re embarrassed about losing your job, tell your friends that you’ve lost your job and are looking.  Do things that scare you.  You’ll be surprised at how this will boost your confidence.    Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.     Liz-small-150x150Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson   Losing a job can take an emotional toll and it is important to allow yourself time to grieve and recover. Spend time with family, friends and mentors while you work through your emotions. However, make sure you do not neglect your professional community. Continue to participate in your regular professional routines including social media, relationship building, education and reading rituals. Your confidence will recover quicker when you maintain the professional routines that made you successful in the first place.  Learn more about Elizabeth Dexter-Wilsons coaching here.     Kitty small Kitty Boitnott . Confidence is an attitude–a frame of mind. We can sometimes feel on top of the world for no particular reason, and we can just as easily feel deflated even though nothing in particular happened to cause us to feel that way. Confidence is something that we have to work at holding onto, especially when life is challenging us, and let’s face it…the loss of a job is a challenge We are too quick in our society to confuse who we are with what we do. Your job doesn’t define you…you are defined by the strength of your character and the steadfastness of your relationships with yourself and others. For getting back confidence that is “lost” due to a job loss, I encourage my clients to remember each morning all that they have to be grateful for and to adopt a few encouraging affirmations that can help get them through the day. One of my personal favorites is “I am open and receptive to new avenues of income, and I turn every experience into an opportunity for growth.”  Learn about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

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I am an older worker and am experiencing age discrimination. How can I prove to employers that I am hireable? http://careerhmo.com/i-am-an-older-worker-and-am-experiencing-age-discrimination-how-can-i-prove-to-employers-that-i-am-hireable/ http://careerhmo.com/i-am-an-older-worker-and-am-experiencing-age-discrimination-how-can-i-prove-to-employers-that-i-am-hireable/#comments Thu, 09 Oct 2014 14:52:11 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1897

Lisa

Lisa Adams

The best approach to have while in the search process is to show you are teachable.  Is is one of the biggest challenges I see with older job seekers or even prior business owners.  The big hesitation that employers have is “he is so experienced or has owned a company before, he’ll never learn how to fit in or how to do the job the way we want it.”  Their fear is you will not be humble enough to learn from younger peers.  Learning should be a like long process, show that you are this kind of person and you will make a good impression.  Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

At the risk of sounding superficial, I would say that mature job seekers need to bear in mind that first impressions do count.  What’s most important at the end of the day is the experience and skills that you bring with you.  However, if you’re giving off ‘old’ signals, you are doing yourself a disservice.

I’m not suggesting that you try to look or act younger, rather I am encouraging you to be your sharpest you.  Bringing your ‘A’ game to every situation.

To that end … Check your look!  What’s your style?  What’s it saying about you?  Are you walking tall? Or do you shuffle into the room?
Check your language!  Notice I speak about a ‘mature’ job seeker, not older.  I’ve removed the expression ‘I’m old fashioned’ from my vocabulary. I’m proud of my age and enjoy it when people are surprised by it, but I don’t broadcast the number, at least not initially.  I learned a long time ago that people categorize you, so you need to define the category for them.Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

new john
 John Toomey

 

 

 

“The best thing to do is make sure you branded as a specialist and that you are a clear match for the position. Be sure to stay current in your field, show you can work well with wide age groups and be energetic. A super positive attitude can make a big difference.”

    Learn more about John’s coaching here.

Learn more about John’s coaching here.

 

 

 

Kitty Boitnott

I think the best way to prove your are hirable even though you may be an “older worker” is to demonstrate that you are still “trainable” and you aren’t still stuck in the past, unwilling to change with the times. Workers of all ages need to be flexible and must be willing to learn new skills in this new economy. Taking courses, earning certifications, or renewing licenses that may have expired are just a few ways that more veteran workers can demonstrate that they are still willing to learn, want to stay current and up to date with their skills, and that they would make valuable assets to any company lucky enough to have them.

Learn more about Kitty’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

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What happens if I botched a question in an interview? http://careerhmo.com/what-happens-if-i-botched-a-question-in-an-interview/ http://careerhmo.com/what-happens-if-i-botched-a-question-in-an-interview/#comments Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:58:07 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1863 frustrated

 

Lisa

Lisa Adams

Many times we don’t always notice during the interview that we are not being effective. Most of the time it is evaluated afterwards. But when the realization hits you during the interview, which is good, begin to adjust immediately. Here are some ways to do this.

Take a deep breath. Ask, “you know I really think I am not answering your question and I am sorry about for that. Can I quickly restate my answer again?”

Basically, regroup, apologize, and restate.

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

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Kristen Burke

I had a client ask me this recently and it happens more often than you think. Even if you have prepared for every interview question you can think of there is always a wild card. There are a couple of things you can do to bounce back so don’t panic, your first instinct might be to crawl under your chair and die, fight the urge! If you realized your mistake while still in the interview let the interviewer know that you feel you could have answered one of the questions she asked better and ask if she has time for you to try again. Smile about it, the interviewer will not expect you to be perfect and will appreciate your ability to bounce back from your mistake. If you get home and feel you really botched a question you can let the interviewer know in the follow-up email. I would caution you to do this only if you made a big mistake. Do not use this strategy to make minor changes your answers or let negative self talk creep in and make you second guess your answers.

Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here. 

 

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Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

Remember, if you think you have botched a question, it does not mean your interviewer thinks so too. So, be careful not to react immediately with apologies and/or embarrassment. If you feel you need to clarify or re-answer a question, bring it up at the end of the interview; preferably when the interviewer asks you if you have any questions. Start by mentioning you would like to add a few more comments related to an earlier question. Answer the question again based on the answer you truly want to give and then follow up with the questions you have.

For introverts like me, you will probably realize your potential “botches” after you are home from the interview. If this is the case, follow up with an e-mail, thank them for their time and tell them you have a few additional thoughts to share. Clarify the question you feel you “botched”, send off the e-mail and then, mail a separate thank you note to the interviewer.

 Learn more about Elizabeth’s coaching here

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

“If it is apparent to both you and the interviewer that your response has missed the mark, a direct approach is the most effective. As soon as there is an opening to do so, readdress the question that was posed and provide both your insight on what was being asked and why you think it deserves further consideration.

If it is more your perception that an answer went awry, tread more lightly when you circle back to readdress your point. A subtle rephrasing or redirect of your response can allow you to clarify the point and refine your answer without raising a red flag.”

   Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

 

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2

Bud BilanichDon’t let a botched answer to an interview question destroy the entire interview. I once was interviewing a guy who really made a mess of his answer to a question. He knew it and I knew it.
But he was smart. He said, “I really blew that question. Can I have another chance to answer it?”
I said yeas, of course.
He nailed it the second time around.
The lesson in this story is simple. Don’t be afraid to admit that you made a mistake, or blew it when you were answering a question. Ask for a second chance — and then knock it out of the park.
Most interviewers realize that interviewing is a stressful process and and are willing to cut you some slack.
If you meet an interviewer who won’t grant you this simple courtesy, you might want to rethink if you really want to join his or her company.

        Learn more about Bud’s coaching here. 

 

 

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What is the Best Way to Show that my Skills are Transferable to a New Industry? http://careerhmo.com/what-is-the-best-way-to-show-that-my-skills-are-transferable-to-a-new-industry/ http://careerhmo.com/what-is-the-best-way-to-show-that-my-skills-are-transferable-to-a-new-industry/#comments Tue, 23 Sep 2014 16:57:29 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1845

 

skills

Lisa Adams

Lisa

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Show your skills are transferable to a new industry in 2 ways.  Understand what problems you love to solve. Indentify this problem within your new industry.  Is this marketable in this industry?  If so, tie your best skills to the solution.  Highlight these skills in your LinkedIn profile, resume and branding statements.

Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

 

Kristen Burke

KristinNew-01-1-150x150

The first step is to identify your transferable skills, these should be quantifiable skills that you have used in your previous jobs that you feel you will use in the position you are applying for. The skills should be quantifiable because it gives the potential employer proof of you abilities and numbers aren’t subjective. Once you have your quantifiable transferable skills take a look at the job description for the position you are applying to. We always suggest making your resume and transferable skills “speak the language” of the company and position. See what words stick out in the job description and try to make your transferable skills speak to the skills they are looking for. Keep an open mind when looking at your previous experience, chances are there are skills you honed that you might not be aware of.

 

Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson  

Liz-small-150x150

Today’s working world demands sought after 21st century workplace skills that include the following

  Ways of Thinking such as creativity, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making and learning

  Ways of Working including communication & collaboration

Tools for Working which involve technology, and

Skills for Living in the World that include citizenship, life & career and personal & social responsibility.

As a professional in the process of changing industries or pursuing a new industry, this is great news for you! You have already established the majority of these sought after skills and they are all easily transferable. Your next step is to identify your stories that fit with these skills and describe how they will bring value to this new industry. Work on updating your branding statement to fit this new industry and you are on your way.

 

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What is the Difference between Marketing and Branding? http://careerhmo.com/what-is-the-difference-between-marketing-and-branding/ http://careerhmo.com/what-is-the-difference-between-marketing-and-branding/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 17:39:17 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1828 marketingvsbranding

kristen_web_2772Kristen Burke

I found this great quote on microarts.com; ” Marketing is your message. Your brand is who you are. ” Communicating your brand to a potential employer tells them what is unique about you and how you will stand out from the crowd. A great place to use your message or to market yourself would be in your cover letter. I have found that most people have an easier time marketing themselves instead of branding but it is important to create your brand first so you know what you are marketing and what skills you need to be highlighting. 

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

Branding and marketing go hand in hand as you build your network. A strong consistent brand speaks to who you are in the context of your career and goals. As you clarify your brand you can then move forward with marketing yourself.Marketing today must include being savvy about social media. Proactively promote your brand through LinkedIn, Twitter and/or Facebook online. You’ll need to market your brand through any and all of the places where you network online and in-person.

 
new john
John Toomey
“Branding is defining yourself as a specialist making it clear to everyone what you are offering. By focusing on key words, your transferable skills and related job experience anyone looking at your resume or LinkedIn profile has a clear understanding of your brand. Marketing is more how you are reaching out to perspective employers or clients if you are more focused on contracting your services. Identifying those companies and making connections with people in those companies is more the marketing of yourself. ”  Learn About John’s coaching here.

 
bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

You brand yourself by thinking of the two or three words you want others to associate with you and then consistently and constantly acting in a manner consistent with your brand, You market yourself by making as many people as possible aware of your brand. You can do this through networking, blogging, commenting on blogs and being active in your professional organizations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why Do I Need to Brand Myself As A Specialist? http://careerhmo.com/why-do-i-need-to-brand-myself-as-a-specialist/ http://careerhmo.com/why-do-i-need-to-brand-myself-as-a-specialist/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 13:37:24 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1815  

blogspecialist

Lisa Adams

Lisa

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Branding yourself as a specialist keeps you from being a generalist like so many other professionals in the market today. I too have struggled with this while I was in HR and in Corporate Development.  Tell others what your specialty is and they will help in your search. This gives direction to your job search, career, and networking when you hone in on a specialty that you enjoy. It really is a must in today’s market.

 Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

KristinNew-01-1-150x150

Kristen Burke

In thinking about why you need to brand yourself as a specialist I was trying to think of a career where being a generalist would be important. I couldn’t think of any, the only thing that came to mind was “Jack of all trades, master of none.” You don’t want that quote to come to mind when potential employers are looking at your resume.  I was recently looking for someone to paint a condo, I looked for ads on craigslist to see who I could find. There were many ads for “jack of all trades” but I was afraid that, while they were cheaper and could do many different things, they weren’t going to be exceptional at painting. I ended up hiring a painter, I paid more but the job was done right. As an “employer” I was looking for someone to be a specialist and I was willing to pay more for, this is what you will run into with every employer. I have never seen a job posting asking for a generalist so don’t advertise yourself that way.

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley
“Everyone is multi-faceted, bringing multiple skills, experiences, strengths and knowledge that they have acquired throughout their career.

In today’s job market, the stakes have been raised due to several factors, e.g., the increase in the number of people competing for the same positions and employers looking for the ‘perfect’ candidate.  Social media gives you the ability to gain a wider audience, however, it also demands that your message is strong and consistent.  You need to present your strengths and your uniqueness.

To brand yourself as a specialist, i.e., in order to show your breadth AND depth, you’ll need to identify your ‘T’.  Your breadth of experience, skills, strengths and unique talents are the horizontal of your brand’s ‘T’.  The vertical of your ‘T’, the depth of your brand, is that area where you are the ‘Subject Matter Expert’.  It may be what you know, what you do, or how you do it.  However you define your area of expertise, this is the core of your specialist brand.  Present a strong core and it will support, and be enhanced by, all of your other skills.

new john
 John Toomey

“In today’s job market it is critical to standout and one way is to position ourselves as a specialist in what we do. Through our personal branding we decide what we are looking for in a career and focus our transferable skills in that area. This positions us as a specialist in our area and allows us to standout among the average generalist focused candidates. When someone is seeing our resume or LinkedIn profile it is clear and to the point on what we offer.”

 

bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

Specialists land jobs.  That’s why you need to brand yourself as a specialist.

When I first hung out my shingle as a consultant, I made a typical beginner’s mistake.  I went after assignments that I “could” do.  I didn’t land too many of those types of gigs.

When I branded myself as a specialist in team development, I started to prosper.

The funny thing here is that once I gained entry into a number of companies, I began getting asked if I could do things for them outside of team development. I could and did.  But it all began by branding myself as a specialist.  Brand yourself as a specialist and increase your chances of success.. Learn more about Bud’s coaching here. 

 

Liz-small-150x150Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson  

Competition for jobs is fierce and the ability to stand out makes all the difference when it comes to landing employment. This is where branding yourself as a specialist becomes crucial. Being a specialist brings you out of the crowd, highlights your unique value and grabs the attention and interest of those seeking this unique value. So, what is this “super power” you possess? And how has it made you the “go to” person? Find the answer and use it to launch your brand to the next level. If you struggle with identifying this super power, simply ask those who know you best. They will give you the answers you need to help brand you as a specialist.

 

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How Do I Build A Relationship with People and Companies that are Important in my Job Search? http://careerhmo.com/how-do-i-build-a-relationship-with-people-and-companies-that-are-important-in-my-job-search/ http://careerhmo.com/how-do-i-build-a-relationship-with-people-and-companies-that-are-important-in-my-job-search/#comments Tue, 26 Aug 2014 18:59:04 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1795 Relationships

How Do I Build A Relationship with People and Companies that are Important in my Job Search?

 

 

Lisa Adams

Lisa

 

To build relationships with people at your target companies, begin conversations. Reach out to colleagues at the company that you could relate to, either via LinkedIn, mutual contacts, or associations.  The best thing you can do is talk about your industry.  Share what you have been learning about the industry or around changes that are effecting the industry.​  Relationships will start when common interests are discussed.

Learn About Lisa’s Coaching Here

 

Kristen Burke

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I love this topic, as a coach I get asked this question all the time. Don’t put too much pressure on making crucial connections, think of this process as a fact finding mission. LinkedIn has made it very easy to connect with people who are in your industry or work in companies you would like to work for. Find people you are interested in learning more about and reach out to them

. Ask them what they like about the company they work for and how they got there.  Most people will be flattered you reached out and are usually happy to share information. I also think reaching out to people you already know who are in your industry is important.

Set up a time to meet or chat even if they don’t work for a company you are interested in. They might know someone they can introduce you or at least be a reference when you land that interview. Remember to continue networking even after you get a job.

 Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here.   

Anne Marie Cooley
ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Build upon the three things you can do immediately – research | connect | network (blog post 8/18). Once you have initiated your efforts by reaching out to the individuals and companies of interest, concentrate on nurturing that relationship.A key to building the relationship is to be proactive in your approach.  Keep in mind that you reached out to them.  Find opportunities to continue to connect with these individuals.   Take the time to continue to learn about their company within the industry so that you can speak to their role.Relationships take time and nurturing to enable them to grow.  Time will determine how and when this will impact your search.   Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

 

 
Liz-small-150x150Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

Use company websites and LinkedIn company profiles to research and select 10 companies you would love to work for. Then, again using LinkedIn, research and identify 5 people in each of those companies that you find interesting and would like to build a professional relationship with. Send a personalized connect request to each of these individuals and, if they accept, stay in touch monthly by paying it forward, sending articles relevant to their industry or offering to assist them with projects or challenge

Find out where these people “hang out” online. What LinkedIn groups are they in and what kinds of issues, ideas or concerns do they address and discuss in these groups. What Twitter Chats do they frequent. Become a regular in these same groups and chats, offer smart, educated ideas and opinions and begin to build credibility with them. The more they read your ideas and opinions, the more you will build your credibility with them, an alliance will begin to form and you will become a colleague.

Learn more about Elizabeth Dexter-Wilsons coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What Are the Three Most Important Things I Can Do Right Now to Advance My Job Search? http://careerhmo.com/what-are-the-three-most-important-things-i-can-do-right-now-to-advance-my-job-search/ http://careerhmo.com/what-are-the-three-most-important-things-i-can-do-right-now-to-advance-my-job-search/#comments Tue, 19 Aug 2014 19:51:58 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1784 advance

What Are the Three Most Important Things I Can Do Right Now to Advance My Job Search?

 

 

 

Kristen Burke

KristinNew-01-1-150x150

The three things you can do to increase your chances of getting hired would be:

1.) NETWORK! I cant emphasize enough. Grow your connections related to your industry on LinkedIN, go to networking events in your area, chat the person up next to you in the restaurant, the barbeque, your friendsand increase your linkedin visibility by getting recommendations and endorsements.

2.) UPDATE YOUR LINKEDIN PROFILE- LinkedIN is an incredible tool – its the way recruiters and hiring managers find you! Get you key words optimized, get a great picture, get endorsements and recommendations, all are important in helping your LinkedIN profile work for you      and not against you!

3.)WORK YOUR JOB SEARCH! - be consistent, dedicated, and don’t give up. All the tools you need are here on CareerHMO. Use all the resources  that we offer here      at CareerHMO and use them! You can have all the resources in front of you – if you don’t use them it will make your job  search longer and more frustrating!

 Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here.   

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

“The three things that you can do right away to improve your chances … research | connect | network!

The precursor to researching companies is to know yourself – your skills, experience, likes and dislikes.  Then research the market with your unique criteria.

If you aren’t connected with a LinkedIn profile, you need to do so immediately.  I cannot over emphasize the benefit of your professional online brand.

Network at every opportunity – in person, online – wherever your day takes you.  Every encounter is an opportunity to network.  Remember the ‘six degrees of separation’ principle!  Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

 
bb head shot suzanne 4:2 Bud Bilanich

 

1) Prepare a unique resume and cover letter for every job in which you’re interested.  This will give you the best chance of getting an interview.  Highlight how your skills and experience are and exact match for the job.  Gather as much information about the job as you can.  Job descriptions found in ads will give you some idea of keywords to highlight in your resume and cover letter.

 

2) Make sure you take full advantage of an interview by preparing intensely.  Do your best to anticipate the questions you are likely to get, then prepare specific answers to those questions. Decide on points that you want to make about your skills and experience and figure out how you are going to get these points into the conversation if you are not asked a direct question. Get comfortable with your answers by practicing them out loud.  Role play with your partner, spouse or friend.

3) Stay positive.  Surround yourself with positive people.  Job hunting is a frustrating experience. You need to build a support network that will be there as you go through it. The best way to build a strong network of positive people is to be a positive person yourself.  Br willing to help others achieve their goals.

  Learn more about Bud’s coaching here.

Liz-small-150x150Elizabeth Dexter-Wilson

1) Know the heck out of your industry. The more you know about what is going on in your industry, the more you are able to share ideas, identify issues and plan solutions. Becoming an industry thought leader will set you apart from the crowd and make you a top notch candidate. Follow industry blogs and companies on LInkedIn and Twitter. Join industry groups and become a regular who shares and discusses issues and ideas.

2) Build strong professional relationships with industry experts. Identify who these people are, reach out to them and begin corresponding. Learn from them, ask questions and pay it forward. They will become mentors and allies for you that will pay you back ten fold when seeking employment.

3) Demonstrate your unique value. Don’t just tell others what you have to offer, prove it by engaging and being active in your industry. Participate through volunteering, interning, holding leadership roles in professional associations or even guest blogging. People hire those who have proven what they can accomplish.

Learn more about Elizabeth Dexter-Wilsons coaching here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How Can I Make My Cover Letter Stand Out? http://careerhmo.com/how-can-i-make-my-cover-letter-stand-out/ http://careerhmo.com/how-can-i-make-my-cover-letter-stand-out/#comments Tue, 12 Aug 2014 19:04:52 +0000 http://careerhmo.com/?p=1774

This Week’s Challenge – How to Make My Cover Letter Stand Out?

 

 

Lisa

Lisa Adams

Show you are a part of their tribe by describing a story of how you have used their products / services; interacted with their team; saw their product make a difference.  The more you can describe how you connect with them, the better

​     Learn more about Lisa’s coaching here. 

 

 

 

KristinNew-01-1-150x150

Kristen Burke

The cover letter is your opportunity to catch the employers attention. You want to make a connection with the company and give examples of past work that is relevant to the position you are applying for. Do not use vague terms like, loyal, hardworking and dependable. Take the opportunity to really tell them what you are about

  Learn more about Kristen’s coaching here.

 

 

ANNE_MARIE_COOLEY_profile photo-1Anne Marie Cooley

Get them at hello“! [J.T. O'Donnell]  Cull the myriad sources of cover letter techniques available throughout social media.  You’ll find that the tips are variations on the same themes, the best of which are available to you right here on CareerHMO!  Not a member yet?, scroll down and check out the ‘Free Tools | CareerRx | Quick Tip: Cover Letter Effectiveness Test’.  Within the first few seconds, J.T. hits the nail on the head, “Get them at hello.

Once you’ve grabbed your reader’s attention, you then need to keep that attention by providing the information needed to evaluate you further.  Is your format impeccable?  Do you leave your reader with a sense of you, i.e., does your attitude shine through?  Have you connected with your reader by sharing your voice?  And last but most definitely not least, have you presented your experience in alignment with the stated requirements for the position?”   Learn more about Anne Marie’s coaching here.

 

John Toomey
The first thing with your cover letter is make sure it is not a summary of your resume, let your resume showcase your skills. What we need to do is to write a letter that connects you to the company, what makes you excited about them. Make it personal and get them hooked on you so they want to read more about you by going to your resume and invite you for an interview. The cover letter needs to be the smile and handshake they would see if you were standing in front of them.   Learn more about John’s coaching here. 
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